Volume I

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The first volume covers five Mandalas (books). The Book of the Deva (Gods), the Book of the Rishi (Sages), the Book of the Yajna (sacrifice), the Book of Biti (divine powers) and the Book of Pragatha (son of Rishi Kanwa). Deva Mandala describes how the epic is manifested, the beginning of creation, the births of Gods and Demons, their fights, the birth of the God of Truth - Satyadeva and creation of the Time Wheel. The Rishi Mandala details the life of sage Vashishta and destruction wreaked by the sage Vishwamitra. It also describes of the work of the dark forces of the night (Nakta) and the establishment of psychic being Vitihotra. The Yajna Mandala describes how the sages sought the help of the God of Fire, the Agni, to commence a divine sacrifice to invoke Satyadeva, God of Truth, who had disappeared from creation due to the presence of dark forces. These chants are the Hymns to the Mystic Fire to bring again truth to the creation. Biti Mandala narrates about the powers of the divine deities, and the purification of Vitihotra, the (psychic being). After purification, the psychic being identifies with the Truth. This happens in the presence of the divine trinity - Brahma, Vishnu and Maheshwara together with other Godheads, sages and the four divine powers - Maheshwari, Mahakali, Mahalakshmi and Saraswati. Pragatha Mandala describes the family of Kanwa rishi, and the marriage of his son, Pragatha with Gathini. They are the parents of Kali, the deity of the Iron Age. The book covers detailed stories of Kali's childhood and how he became anti-divine. The story of the birth of Trita and Dwita, sons of Rishi Aptya, who would restrict the influence of Kali during the absence of Satyadev is also included.

Volume II

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The second volume of Devayan covers the complete book on the Silver Age (Trita) and partly the book on Rama. Rama is the most important incarnation of Vishnu whose impact has remained very strong on the mind of the devout Hindu. The Trita Mandala covers the activities of the Gods, Kings and Sages on one hand and the evil deeds of Kali, Shani, Shukracharya, Ravan and Kumbhkaran on the other. It narrates the lives of the Kings from the Sun dynasty namely the King Harishchandra and his descendants, his son Rohitashwa, Rohitashwa's son Ikshwaku, Ikshwaku's son Dilip, Dilip's son Raghu and Raghu's son Auja. The well-known story of King Harishchandra who handed over his entire Kingdom and wealth to the Sage Vishwamitra who was under the influence of Kali has been narrated with great poetic style. How the King Harishchandra adhered to truth in the most difficult circumstances has been brilliantly brought out by the poet. Under the spell of Kali, the sage Vishwamitra struggled against the sage Vashishtha and was instrumental in having Vashishtha's hundred sons killed. The saga of how Ravan by his yogic tapasya received the boon of immortality at the banks of the legendary lake Mansarovar, his establishment as a powerful King of Lanka and his repeated wars with the neighbouring Kings of the Silver Age, who were fighting on the side of the Gods in protecting heaven from Ravan's attacks, is fascinating. The Ram Mandala describes the life of Auja's son Dashratha. It goes on further to cover the birth and the life of Dashratha's four sons, Ram the incarnation of Vishnu, Lakshman, Bharat and Shatrughan. The lives of these four princes are further depicted very well in the first two cantos of the Ramayana, the Bal Kanda and the Ayodhya Kanda. Many more vivid stories describe in detail the struggle of forces of Light against Darkness.

Volume III

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The Third volume of Devayan covers the remaining five Books of Ramayana, namely the Aranya, Kishkindhya, Sundar, Lanka and Uttar Kandas narrated in an aesthetic, simple language. It differs from the styles of Valmiki, Tulsidas and Kamban in narration. It describes also in detail events subsequent to the disappearance of Queen Sita into the mother earth in the Book of Lava (the son of Lord Ram). The fates of Lakshman, Bharat and Shatrughan the three brothers of Lord Rama are also detailed in this book together with the description about how the sons of Lord Rama - Lava and Kusha - get married and how they grow up to take up their responsibilities. An interesting episode mentioned is how Kali influenced Rishi Durvasa, feared by everyone for his dreadful anger. He convinced Rishi Durvasa to visit Ayodhya to request the immediate audience of Lord Rama. At the same, Kali himself visited Rama and obtained his promise that under no condition should there be any disturbance in their talks. In case of any disturbance that person would, without fail, be exiled. Lakshman fearing the sage’s wrath forced his way in to inform Lord Ram about the sage’s presence. As Lakshman had disturbed the conversation between Kali and Lord Ram, Lord Rama was forced to banish his beloved brother, resulting in Lakshman’s self-immersion in the river Saryu. Of great interest and novelty is the conversation between Lord Rama and King Janak. Lord Rama imparts the complete Vedantic knowledge to king Janak. He describes the various paths of yogas - Raja, Hatha and Bhakti yoga and the ways to obtain complete self-realization. Lord Rama also imparts the knowledge of the Upanishads to King Janak in a very eloquent and understandable manner. This volume ends with the passing away of Lord Rama, who was mourned by the whole world. After Lord Rama’s demise, Kusha visited Lanka to see for himself the places where his father waged the great war against Ravana and also where his mother, Queen Sita suffered her painful seclusion. At the time of Kusha’s visit to Lanka, the snakes, under the encouragement of Kali, took control of Lanka to rob the precious stones amassed by the Gods, and killed all inhabitants of Lanka except King Vibhishan. He was spared as he had received the boon of immortality. Following Lava’s revenge on all snakes, he himself falls a prey to snakebite and dies. The volume contains many more amazing stories rich in narration, imagery and poetry.

Volume IV

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The fourth volume describes the events occurring during the transition from the Silver to the Bronze Age, that ends with the rule of Queen Savitri. The Dwapara Yuga commences with the reign of her son Nahush and grandson Yayati. This volume consists of the four Mandalas -Bhrigu, Rajrishi, Savitri and a portion of the Dwita Mandala. In the Bhrigu mandala, there is the towering figure of Rishi Bhrigurama or Parshurama. We see how Rishi Bhrigu destroys the Kshatrias of the world, time and again, as he considered them responsible for disturbing the peace of the world. As a result, for a period of time, the world was ruled by the Brahmins who were more interested in performing their spiritual activities. We come to know about the stories of Atri and Anusuya, a lady whom even the Gods looked up to. We garner an immense amount of knowledge about Dattatreya, a being who had in him the spiritual strength of Brahma, Vishnu and Maheshwara. We come to know the events in the lives of Nala and Damayanti. We witness the epic fight between Kali and Nala, between the evil forces and the adherent of Truth. How Nala managed to refuse to follow the edicts of Kali, the Lord of the Iron Age, inspite of the terrible occurrences in his life are all covered here. We come to know about the reigns of Dhyumna, the son of Lava and his grandson Dyumatsen as well as that of Ashwapati, the first Emperor from the Lunar Dynasty. In the Rajrishi Mandala, we have thirty-nine Upanishads out of the 108 narrated in a very simple language, easily understandable even by laymen. We read with awe, in magnificient verse, among others the Isha, Kena, Katha, Chandogya, Kaivalya, Paingalya, Shandilyo, Aitereyo, Taittiriya and Brihdaranyako Upanishads. These are epic hymns of knowledge of self, the world and mainly the Divine. These chants of inspired knowledge breathe a feeling of religious aspiration and ecstasy beyond any cult. Such a wealth of knowledge is waiting for our discovery. Further on in the Savitri Mandala, we come to know about the birth and upbringing of Savitri, her marriage with Satyavan; and her epic fight with Yama to save her husband’s life. To prepare herself for this colossal task, she undertakes a very severe penance for the whole year after her marriage. This has been detailed in powerful imagery and descriptions. We see how she becomes the Empress of the world and how she defeats the demonic forces with an army solely formed of women. In the Dwita Mandala, we observe the times of Nahusha and Yayati, Savitri’s son and grandson. What lingers in memory for a long time is Nahusha's visit to the various worlds of the Gods. His observations on seeing the various worlds as well as his conversations with Lord Indra, Surya, Yama etc are simply magnificent. All this has been described in great detail and in powerful poetry. Nahusha received the boon of having a hundred sons like gods who would be instrumental in repopulating the world. The fourth volume finishes with part of the narration on King Yayati, the grandson of Satyavan and Savitri. Here we have the remarkable story of how he was cursed with old age from the great Shukracharya and how he received the boon of regaining his youth if one of his sons agreed to part with his youth for a limited period.

Volume V

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This volume details the remainder of the Dvita Mandala as well as the entire Bharata Mandala. Also, we have the beginning of the Mahabharata in the Bharata Mandal. In the Dvita Mandala the account of King Yayati continues. We see the sudden decreptitude of King Yayati in his youth as he is cursed by the great Shukracharya, the Perceptor of the Demons and the father of Devayani, his Queen. This was as he could not control his desire for Sharmishta, her friend. After the passage of several years, when Yayati’s four sons have grown up, Shukracharya gives him the boon that he could regain his youth for a limited time if one of his sons was willing to lend him his youth and accept instead the old age of their father. Out of the four sons, the youngest, Pururava, the son of Sharmishta, agrees to this strange demand. Consequently, he is the one who inherits the Kingdom after Yayati’s departure from this world. What follows is the wonderful tale of the immortal love of Pururava and Urvashi, a divine danseuse. She remains with Pururava for a hundred years before leaving him and her son, Dusyanta when he is only a child. So many stories have been told of this unique love story that it is of interest even today. But the departure of Urvashi left a broken-hearted Pururava and he told his son not to trust in love. When Dusyanta grows up, he takes as his consort the beautiful Shakuntala the daughter of the great Rishi Vishwamitra and Menaka. An interesting story is behind her birth. In fact, Vishwamitra was deep in his meditation to achieve immense spiritual riches and he was very near his goal. At that time, Lord Indra sent Menaka to disrupt his tapasya and become interested in day to day life. Shakuntala was the result. After her birth, Menaka left the world as her mission was fulfilled. When Rishi Vishwamitra realised the truth he became consumed with a devouring anger against Lord Indra. He left the little baby girl alone in the depth of an immense forest. The vultures took care of the little baby on finding it alive. Subsequently, Rishi Kanva on passing through the forest heard a little baby. He took the baby girl and gave her the name Shakuntala. We can enjoy the detailed story of Dusyanta and Shakuntala, their love and their separation due to Dusyanta’s loss of memory. Shakuntala’s valiant son, Damnaka at the age of two managed to save a rabbit from the mouth of a python. He was living in the wilderness and made friends with all wild animals. His best friends were a family of lions who carried him on their backs and played with him. He grew up to be the glorious Bharata, from whom India received her name. During his education, he learnt to worship sound in order to reach spiritual heights. With his reign, the Bharata Mandala begins. Under his glorious reign, he divided the whole world into seven regions. Out of these, Bharata was the one which was to be the spiritual centre of the world. Even now we can see that after the ravages of the Iron Age, we find the greatest number of spiritually advanced teachers in India. This is followed by the detailed accounts of the reign of Ajatashatru, Kuru, Hasti and Pratipa. King Kuru is known mostly for undertaking 100 Yajnas as commanded by Lord Shiva. Lord Indra placed obstacles during the 100th Yajna as he did not allow competition to himself. After a long struggle, Lord Indra grants that the area of Kurukshetra becomes the holy land and any warrior dying there would ascend directly to heaven. Then we see the life of Shantanu, his marriage with Gangadevi and then subsequently with Satyavati. We also read about how Rishi Bhrigu composed the Bhrigu Samhita to help the generations living in the turbulent and ominous Iron Age. We can even now obtain divine help and guidance from this miraculous source written thousands of years before to live his or her life to the utmost. Interpersed inbetween we read about the Vamana incaranation of Lord Vishnu and how he defeated the invincible Bali just by asking him the boon of three feet of land and many other stories. The fifth volume ends with the magnificent and thrilling first chapter of the Mahabharata called the ‘Aadi Parva” which tells the story of the early days of the Pandavas and the Kaurava’s, the birth of Lord Krishna and the increasing jealousy of the Kaurava’s for the Pandavas. So much so that Duryodhan often plans to kill his cousins, particularly Bhima against whom he is particularly incensed.

Volume VI

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This volume has only a part of the Bharat Mandala, namely the Mahabharata. It continues from the Sabha Parva to the Gada Parva, nine Parvas of the Mahabharata. The final eight are in the next volume. In the Sabha Parva we see how Duryodhana through his evil machinations becomes the King of Hastinapur in the place of Yudhisthir. He receives his Queen Bhanumati through Karna, his friend. On the other hand, the Pandavas who were considered to have perished in an accidental fire, escaped but had terrifying experiences in the forest as well as in their wanderings through sparsely populated areas and villages. Finally, they attended the Svayamavara ceremony of Draupadi as mendicant Brahmins. When all the Kings failed in the test, Arjun won it as a Brahmin and received the hand of Draupadi. This all happened in the midst of vociferous objections by the assembled Kshatriyas and the reigning Kings. Only, Lord Krishna, together with his brother Balrama, was able to recognised the Pandavas. He had also grieved that the Pandavas together with their mother, Kunti, had died in the blaze of Varnavata. A very interesting issue is dealt with in this Parva and that is the ideal relationship if a woman gets married to more men. Honouring the accidental words of Kunti, the mother of Pandavas, Draupadi weds all the five Pandavas. This is against the norms prevailing at all times and this excited a storm of controversy. How this controversial relationship was regulated by Rishi Vyasa is commendable. The Rishi tells the brothers that Draupadi would be in relationship with only one brother at a time and that too for a period of three years. At that time, the others should remain friendly towards her and not let allow any negative emotion like jealousy or possessiveness to control them. The story of the Mahabharata continues through this and the following eight Parvas. The incidents thrill and excite our imagination in such a vivid manner that we seem to be living through those turbulent times. We experience at firsthand how Truth and Righteousness suffer against the manipulations of the Kauravas time and again. The Pandavas received a barren tract of the Kingdom as their share after they revealed their presence to the world. We see how Indraprastha, the place where nothing would grow, became the magnet of the world at that time due to beauty of the construction, as well as the influence of Yudhisthir. So much so that it incited the inherent jealousy of Duryodhan and he, together with his Uncle Shakuni, managed to grab their entire wealth and power and send them into exile for a long time. Subsequently, when Yudhisthir demanded his Kingdom back, Duryodhan refused to give him any land without war. This led to the great war of Kurukshetra where brother faced brother. It was when Arjun refused to take up arms against his most near and dear ones that Lord Krishna told him that man should do his duty and the results he should leave to Him. This is the Bhagawad Gita that is known to one and all, all over the world. The war of Kurukshetra continued for eighteen days and resulted in the extinction of the hundred Kuru brothers and death for most of the Kings ruling in Bharata. This horrifying result left the land as a vast graveyard with widows and mothers of the slain warriors mourning their dead. At the end of the volume, we witness the epic battle between Duryodhan and Bhima, where Duryodhan was still offerd the chance to defeat Bhima to regain his Kingdom and riches. But he managed to fulfil his promise to Draupadi and defeated Duryodhan and smashed his thighs for the insult that he had inflicted on her. The last words leave him dying on the battlefield.

Volume VII

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The seventh volume of Devayana contains the last eight Parvas of the Mahabharat. We see how Dhritrashtra, with his immense anger, crushed Bhima`s iron statue into smithereens. Ashwathama’s anger was manipulated by Kali, Shani and Rudra Maheshwara to destroy the family and allies of the Pandavas as they slept. The forces of good in the world were destroyed, so that the Kaliyuga could commence in full earnest. We see, how certain persons, influenced by hidden forces, acted like puppets. Ashwathama, on realising the magnitude of his heinous crime, could only repent. The only survivor of the Pandavas was the unborn grandson of Arjun, Parikshit. That occurred only with the help of Lord Krishna and Rishi Vyasa. The great Bhishma, lying on his bed of arrows, waiting for the right time to leave his body, told Yudhisthir about his duties to bring about peace in the world. He showed him how to overcome his sorrow through administering his kingdom well. He also elucidated in a clear manner the elements of a good administration. He spoke about the duties of the rulers and the subjects, the standards of good governance, division of wealth among the entire population, and how peace and prosperity could be furthered in the land. These ideas, if followed even today, could be the solution of the manifold problems facing governments. After the twin Yajnas of the Pandavas and the Yadavs, the world again become peaceful and divine. Then suddenly everything changed. Kali, the leader of the Kaliyuga asked for Rishi Durvasa’s help in the destruction of the Yadavas. Through a simple curse, an unnecessary conflict ensued. In a short time, all the Yadavs died fighting amongst themselves. Krishna then decided to leave the world. With his departure, and according to his wishes, Varuna allowed the glorious island state of Dwarka to be engulfed by monstrous waves and dragged down to the bottom of the sea. Together with incessant and heavy downpour, all the signs of the Yadavs disappeared from this world except for the grandson of Lord Krishna, Vajra. The Pandavas also decided voluntarily to leave this world and go walking up the Himalayas to reach heaven. They left behind their little grandson, Parikshit, as the ruler under the tutelage of Rishi Vyasa. With Rishi Vyasa’s help, Parikshit was protected from evil through a spiritual armour, created out of mantras. With Shukadeva’s guidance, and with the help of Gods, his Kingdom became a very peaceful and happy one. When Shukracharya, the mentor of the Asuras, came to know that the Gods were helping Parikshit to re-establish their suzerainty in the world once more, he became very angry. With his anger his power spread all over. It affected the Gods and made them powerless. They became weak and their time for resting started. Humanity was influenced negatively without any succour. Humanity lost their faith in Gods and became consumed with desire, anger, ego, attachment, jealousy and greed. Also, Shukracharya asked Shani to further diseases, old age, death and natural disturbances in the world. Humanity became increasingly restless and lost their tranquility. Arbuda, the Snake King controlled the power of money. Shukracharya also instructed Kali and Shani to make Parikshit weak and destroy him so that the Kaliyuga could begin in earnest.

Volume VIII

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We are pleased to bring out this volume also transcribed into the Devanagari script. It begins with the curse given to Parikshit, the grandson of the Pandavas, that he would die in a week’s time by a snake bite. During this time, Shukdeva, his Guru chanted the Bhagwata Purana, describing the birth, life and activities of Lord Krishna and his passing away. Many Brahmins and Rishis and Kings came to participate in this great event. In this Assembly, Takshak, the powerful snake, was also present in the form of a Brahmin. When all were engrossed in hearing about Dwarka going into the ocean, he took his original form and bit Parikshit, killing him instantaneously. At that time Janmejaya was only eight years of age. For this reason, Queen Aparna took up the responsibilities of the whole Kingdom. But he had witnessed how his father had been killed. He was very angry and wished to destroy these snakes completely. Later on, when he took up the responsibilities of the Kingdom, the terror spread by the snakes had become unbearable. They created an atmosphere of fear and terror as they attacked human beings without any reason. On the advice of his Guru, a huge sacrificial ceremony was organised to eradicate them entirely through the power of chants and mantras. The Sarpa Satra or the snake ceremonial pyre was an awe inspiring event. The power of the mantras were such that the snakes were pulled out from wherever they were hiding in the mountains, forests, rivers, oceans, or even in the netherworlds. The flames of the sacrificial pyre reached the sky. None could escape it. Then a radiant Rishi appeared there. His name was Astik. With the force of his personality he brought the whole process to a sudden halt. He reminded the Brahmins and the Kings assembled there that not a single creation of Brahma, the Creator, could be completely destroyed, as it would bring His wrath on the world. He assured them that the snakes would proceed to the nether worlds and not trouble humanity any more. The one dream of Janmejaya was to somehow banish the Kali Yuga and prevent it from harming humanity. Rishi Vyasa told him to spread the Mahabharata in the whole world as people would learn how to remain steadfast to Truth and not fall in the trap of this devilish Age. His efforts were all rendered futile and at the end of his reign he died at the hands of Kali.

Volume IX

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We are pleased to bring out Volume 9 of the epic Devayana. This is also transcribed into the Devanagari script. This is the second part of the Rudra Kalpa. In this we get a bird’s eye view of the past historical period that we know through our extensive historical research. This can be sometimes questionable as it is based on past records, which we all know can be manipulated. History is always written by the Conqueror. Also, our knowledge of ancient history is based on archaeological finds that we have found so far. The possibility always exists that perhaps we have not looked at the right places with that intensity or that these discoveries are still awaiting us in the future. Here we come to know who Homer, the world famous poet, was. How did he manage to describe so vividly scenes in his famous epics, Iliad and Odyssey, when he was blind from birth? How was he born blind is also detailed here. We see how Alexander the Great with his invincible army swept through Greece, Turkey and Persia securing victory after victory until he reached the Indian subcontinent. These events are described here in great details. In India, we see how the Kings of the Nanda dynasty become immersed in self-indulgence and enjoyment. We see how Chandragupta Maurya became a Great Emperor and brought the whole of India under his sway as for the first time India had to face an external threat. Subsequently we observe the widespread Kingdom of Ashoka. During the later part of his life, he became a Buddhist and was instrumental in spreading it’s principles in the East. Later on, followed the Gupta dynasty and others till slowly India became weak and without valour and Dharma. Now the Kaliyuga was in full force all over the world. As it was predicted ages ago by the Rishis, the Yavanas and the Mlecchas would become all powerful. They would during the course of this Age, slowly and surely, overpower the whole world and bring it under their control. The glory and the bravery that India demonstrated in the previous Ages would be seriously diminished as the Asuras, or the negative forces, slowly sapped that energy away. Also, as the Gods and the Rishis were resting, the Asuras would take a human birth and play a major role in the world in spreading negativity around. As we can now observe, these wise men proved to be so correct. At this time of the dark Kali, Lord Brahma gave the responsibility to some immortals to bring a ray of light and hope into this vitiated atmosphere of hopelessness and despair. These Immortals brought their message of peace and hope to this gloomy world. Thus, the various religions came into existence. They tell us to avoid succumbing to these negative forces as succour will come to humanity when the Gods again descend on the earth. This would happen at the beginning of the Golden Age. Alas, the message brought down by these Immortals also became contaminated by these very same hostile and negative forces. Religions that came down to help humanity in this hour of dire need became a further cause of widespread death and destruction. The followers became convinced that to protect the truth of their message they would have to destroy those with differing beliefs. They forgot that no religion enjoins killing anyone.In India, waves and waves of invaders came and tried to destroy the Sanatana Dharma. First, the Muslims came from Central Asia, Persia and Turkey, followed by the Moghuls. They forced people to convert to their belief or to perish by the sword. When the Moghul empire lost its power through internal strife, groups of Europeans who had come to trade, saw their opportunity and overwhelmed the country. As power was dispersed, they easily took over from them. The ancient knowledge and civilisation was practically wiped out.

Volume X

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INTRODUCTION

In our long journey through the Ages, we have now reached the tenth volume of the epic Devayana. We are pleased to bring out this volume also transcribed into the Devanagari script. In the higher worlds there was an immense amount of activity as Time moved on towards a major change. The Gods and the Rishis decided that it was time to invoke Satyadeva, the Lord of Truth, to influence the world. For such an event it was important that the Rishis go to the mortal world and join their spiritual force and ardent prayers to those of the anguished humanity and beleaguered earth, suffering under the constant onslaughts of the fierce dark forces. At that time, colonisation apparently to “civilise the world” was widely-spread with all its ills. Greed and cruelty had become rampant. To satisfy the ego of a few races, vast stretches of the world had been enslaved and they had to suffer. For this reason, some great Rishis came to the mortal world. One of them was Ramakrishna Parmahansa. He worshipped the Divine Mother and lit the psychic flame of intense reverence for the Eternal Truth. When he attained realisation, he announced to the world the unity of all religions. Although there existed many paths, several creeds and ways of looking at life the goal remained the same. There was no separate hell or heaven for different religions. One went to heaven or hell depending upon one’s actions. This message was conveyed very powerfully to the West by Rishi Vivekananda at the Parliament of the World's Religions in 1893 in Chicago, USA. The world was startled to hear about this radical thought and their way of looking at this issue underwent a sea-change. Then, Sri Aurobindo added his spiritual force to the concentrated efforts made by Ramakrishna to light the psychic flame of aspiration, to prepare the way for the Supramental Age to descend. He wanted to make humanity aware of the divine forces working within each one of us. He realised that India must achieve its independence to lead the world into the Golden age with its Sanatana Dharma. Later on, he realised that the time was still not ripe for this gigantic step, as the dark forces had used their powers to mislead the world into unbearable pain and suffering through two world wars and the constant strife. After leaving this world, Sri Aurobindo through his vast psychic powers, facilitated the descent of the Devayana, which describes the earth-shaking events of the Four Ages that would lead us to the splendour of the long-awaited Golden Age. As the Rigveda mentions rigveda Rig. VII.76.2 “The result of this birth of divine vision is that man’s path manifests itself to him and those journeying’s of the Gods or to the Gods “Devayana” which lead to the infinite wideness of the Divine Existence. Before me the paths of the journeying’s of the Gods have become visible, journeying’s that violate not, whose movement was formed by the Vasus. The eye of the Dawn has come into being in front and she has come towards us over our houses”. Sri Aurobindo, On the Vedas, p.209 Amita Nathwani

Volume XI

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INTRODUCTION In our long journey through the Ages, we have now reached the eleventh volume of the epic Devayana. It is the fourth part of the Rudra Kalpa. As mentioned in earlier volumes, the epic narrates to us the complete story of the constantly repeating human cycle that covers the Golden, the Silver, the Bronze and the Iron Ages. These four Ages form a cycle lasting 26,000 years. Through the Devayan, the entire story of the spiritual civilisation of the world unfolds in front of our eyes. This time cycle has been divided into three Kalpas - or the Ages – namely of the Creator, the Preserver and the Destroyer – widely known as Brahma, Vishnu and Rudra. We are pleased to bring out this volume also transcribed into the Devanagari script. When the Divine Dawn, Usha touches the mortal world, a new era begins and a new consciousness arises.  At that time, Usha together with the Divine Mother, Vanga, visits the world soul, Vishwadeva, hidden away in the lower vital plane in a secret corner of Bengal.  Usha sees her consort being kept under an iron control in a comatose condition by the hostile powers of the lower vital.  They hold him under constant bondage with sleep keeping him unaware of all happenings around him.  In this way, he remained unconscious of his potential greatness and the role he had to play in the world.  Actually, we see the same image being replicated in our physical world. The entire humanity is completely unconscious of its glorious divine nature and ignorant of the immeasurable powers under its command. In the Akhyana Mandala, we can read the tales of Gods like Brihaspati, the Guru of the Gods, the furious Rudra, the unknown Saraswana, and finally Hayagriva - the horse-headed God who appears just before the Golden Age to herald its coming.  We read how the great sacrificial ceremony of Daksha is devastated and turns into a disaster when Sati, daughter of Daksha and consort of Lord Shiva, immolates herself in the holy sacrificial flames.  This was such an earth shaking incident that it would have lead to the complete destruction of creation if Vishnu, as the Protector of the World, did not take up the task to defuse the situation. Similarly, we come to know that Lakshmi did not suddenly appear at the churning of the oceans as it is generally believed.  She was in fact the daughter of Brihaspati, who after becoming disillusioned due to the rise of evil in the world, decided voluntarily to leave this world by immersing herself in the Ocean of Brahma.  There are countless dazzling tales like this in this Mandala. In the Bhaga Mandala, we see how the Gods manage to drive away the hostile and negative forces from the subtle planes of this world and prepare for the coming of the Golden Age.  They bring back to this dark and fearsome mortal world a touch of the divine glory and joy.  This is the divine joy or ananda that is the main reason for this wonderful creation of ours. The inner path between the upper worlds and the mortal world opens up. We hear about the coming down of Bhaga as the son of Usha and Vishwadeva.  He is the God who brings delight into our daily life and spreads joy all around. With Vishwadeva, the World Soul, becoming aware and conscious, the long awaited Golden Age approaches nearer the physical plane and we human beings become progressively transformed.  Earth becomes like heaven and the Gods and human beings become like one.  When the human consciousness continues to develop further and approach divinity, the supramental world descends on the earth. Towards the latter part of this work, we go through the major part of the Indra Mandala.   Here we come to know how the mighty Indra, the Leader of the Gods, is compelled to take birth as a mortal being by the efforts of the Balkhilya Rishis.  These are the sons of Rishi Kanva, who remain for all time, as boys even though they have attained Brahma consciousness and are all powerful.  On observing this tiny yajna, the Gods laughed at their puny efforts to force the mighty Gods like Indra, Surya and Chandra to descend down on the earth as normal human beings.  It appeared to them as if these little boys were merely playing a game of make believe amongst themselves.  These Gods, being many times the size of our vast earth, could not imagine that they could be forced, in any way, to leave their abode in heaven to take up this role.  But these insignificant looking boy Rishis possessed such power in themselves that they were finally forced to descend on the earth as mortal beings to begin the Golden Age, which would last for the next 13,000 years.  The role of these Rishis continued even afterwards.  When Indra in the physical form grows up he receives instruction from them during this sleep.  There he recognizes that he is not just a human being but a might God.  In this was his studies continue.  During the day from his teachers in the physical world and at night from them. In this volume, we come to know the significance of the “Aham Rhitam” mantra.  Just as we received the mantra of “Hare Rama” to help us through the Dwapara Yuga; and “Hare Rama, Hare Krishna”; to face the Kali Yuga, we are made aware of the importance of the “Aham Rhitam” mantra at this juncture of Time.  Lord Indra as Darbhya tells us, This mantra was born out of the ocean of Brahma.  The sound of the mantra, Aham Rhitam, could be heard coming from the ocean”.  This mantra has the power to wipe away all traces of asuric influence in us.  With regular chanting it will make our mind and body completely pure. When continued for a long time, it would remove all self-imposed obstructions created by our rational minds and make us free of the demonic influence of ego, desire, anger, greed, attachment and jealousy.  This it does by slowly making us aware and conscious, thus leading us to identify ourselves not just with our body but instead our soul. Amita Nathwani

Glimpses of Devayan

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This concise book attempts to provide us with an insight into this new epic that narrates to us the beginning of creation, as well as the ever repeating complete human cycle lasting 26,000 years covering the Golden, the Silver, the Bronze and the Iron Ages or the Satya, the Treta, Dwapara and the Kali Yugas. Devayana tells us that mankind will very soon regain its inherent spirituality as we are now at the threshhold of the Golden Age. We come to know from Brahma, Vishnu and Maheshwara the unfolding of events through the Four Ages as they remain ever present. They are the mouthpiece of this narration and we see the events happening in the world through their perspective. They are the chorus who describe the background of the events taking place in front of us. We see heroic and demonic characters of brilliant stature striding across the wide panaroma of the epic. We become part of the cataclysmical conficts beteen the Good and the Evil during the aeons when the Gods and the Titans confronted each other. The heroic figures of yore stride across the wide canvass of the epic and we come to know about the historical events from a different viewpoint. Also we come to know about the events that are still to come in the future All the wonderful stories that our parents and grandparents narrated to us suddenly come to life as we see them really happening before us. For the first time we have a consecutive and comprehensive story of the history of humanity without an interruption. I am more than convinced that no synopsis can really do justice to the original Devayana. One would require a much larger treatise to elucidate the beauty of the epic. However, a much deeper analysis will defeat its own purpose as modern readers, except researchers, have little time. For the first time we have in one epic the details of events that have occupied humanity. With this short synopsis, we hope to draw the attention of interested researchers, seekers of Truth, and lovers of literature to this epic. We earnestly wish to stimulate their curiosity as its close study will surely enrich them.

The Voice of the Rishis

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The Voice of the Rishis is a complementary volume to the great epic, Devayana, and to the Glimpses of Devayana, already published in English. This anthology of Mantras from the Vedas and the Upanishads is elucidated here with simplicity and clarity. These Mantras refer to many events mentioned in the Devayana and prove that these incidents are not only a product of a fertile imagination but the proof of their really happening have existed for aeons in our Vedas, Upanishads and the Epics. While waiting to publish the Devayana, Dr. Hajari received innumerable queries on the subject matter of the new epic from interested people. To find an answer to these queries himself, he meditated intensely and went deep within himself. In his intense concentration, the immortal Rishis appeared in front of him in their luminous bodies. They told him to announce the beginning of the Golden Age on the earth. This they said will come through the manifestation of Satyadeva, the Lord of Truth. This book compiles the answers provided by the Rishis in the form of mantras from the Vedas and the Upanishads. These references from the four Vedas and the Upanishads additionally prove the authenticity of the divine epic. On studying the meanings of the mantras provided by the Rishis, we realize that these mantras have now received a more pertinent significance. Also, we receive a new insight into the Vedas and we become conscious that all these truths were there for everyone to see but only we were blind. A must read for all those who are interested in finding a new insight into the mantras that are a part of our daily life. To help us prepare the advent of the Golden Age, an audio CD, “Welcome to The Golden Age” with the relevant mantras is enclosed herewith.

Tales from the Devayan

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This is the first ever publication of stories from the Devayana, the third epic of India. The epic is as grand and majestic as the human spirit can be. This book is a random collection of well-wrought out stories that will be appreciated not only by the Indian but also by Western readers, who are looking for new insights into Indian mythology. They are from the Four Ages, the Treta, the Dwapara, the Kali and the Satya Yugas or in other words the Silver, the Bronze, the Iron and the Golden Ages. These are interesting and informative stories with profound messages. They are narrated in simple English giving a new dimension to the older versions. A few of these are familiar to us. We have heard them from our grandparents, while others are not so well-known. They all contain a certain mysterious and unknown element as they make us aware about the role of the hidden forces, good or evil, that swirl around us. They are about heroes of mankind who show us the way of truthful living. They effortlessly move deep into our hearts, making their own place. With this collection, the immense trove of Indian classical literature has been enriched by the author’s new approach. This book will add to the spiritual, cultural and historical legacy of India.

Short Stories From the Devayana

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The stories in this book are shorter and simpler versions of some of those told in ‘Tales from the Devayana’.  They all have a universal appeal. There is an increasing interest in our mythological stories as they are mysterious and have an element that beckons us from the beyond. These stories are also told with a new nuance that makes them wonder –tales, special and exclusive. The original source is the Devayana, the third and little known epic of India that covers the entire human cycle. A few explanatory words on the painting on the cover page One dark night, a swift storm shook Pondicherry with torrential rains. In the morning hours, the winds calmed down and the severe rain tailed off in a steady trickle. The strength of Nature turned into the calm silence of Gods. When Dr. Hajari’s assistant came into the clinic to help the Doctor, she did not find him anywhere in the house. At the end, she found him lying down on the terrace in a profound slumber even though he was completely drenched.  He seemed to be enveloped in a great silence, as if in a deep meditation.  She shook him to find out what had had happened to him. He woke up with an effort. His eyes seemed to be different as if they had seen a miracle that changed the course of his life. He remained silent. Much later, while reading the text of the Devayan, it became evident to me that this incident had occurred when Lord Shiva came to visit Sri Aurobindo to dissuade him from expending so much of his power in completing the epic poem Savitri.  During this visit, He had seen a young disciple, Dr. Hajari, sitting and meditating on the terrace of his house. A quote from Sri Aurobindo’s magnum opus explains the whole incident. A message from the unknown immortal Light Ablaze upon creation’s quivering edge, Dawn built her aura of magnificent hues And buried its seed of grandeur in the hours. (Savitri Book1/ canto 1)

Devayan Ek Perichay

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Rishion ki Vani

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